22nd November 2019

Take part in the 2016 Android Experiments I/O Challenge for developers!

Source: Google
Source: Google

If you’re a developer with a passion for creating technology that works best with Android on mobile, tablet or smart watch then you need to share your work and compete in the 2016 Android  Experiments I/O Challenge here and you and your experiment could be on your way to attend the annual Google I/O conference.

The Android Experiments platform for open source application development was launched last year with the following mission:

“Android was created as an open and flexible platform, giving people more ways to come together to imagine and create. Developers everywhere have used the unique capabilities of the platform to push the limits of what’s possible on phones, tablets, watches and beyond.

We’re working to document creative experiments like these and make them open source so anyone can see how they are made, or get inspired to create their own. Our hope is to encourage more developers to challenge how we interact with the devices we use every day.

Each experiment is submitted by the creator, and all kinds are welcome—no matter your skill level, the framework it uses or the device it runs on. If you’ve created something amazing on Android you’d like to share, please submit your own experiment.

What makes a good experiment? you might ask. Google says “it’s a project that utilizes the unique capabilities of the Android platform in an innovative way” and gave a few suggestions:

  • Creative uses of Android’s new or distinctive features
  • Projects that explore how we interact with our devices, in small and big ways
  • Unique visual aesthetics
  • Open source projects that inspire other developers
  • Surprise us – we want to see the amazing things you’re cooking up

They also shared the following recommendations:

  • Show something shiny right away
  • Remove visual distractions that aren’t part of your experiment
  • Keep it simple, but make it worth the download
  • Imagine how others can get the most out of your project – be clear in how you document your project and your code
  • Don’t require the user to create or log into an account
  • Ask for as few permissions as possible
  • Avoid whitelisting particular Android devices, but it’s okay if your experiment works better on some devices—just let us know
  • Don’t use too much battery or data without warning
  • Please be patient as reviews can take several weeks

To apply enter here: https://androidexperiments.com/challenge before April 13th, 2016. The top 3 winners will attend the 2016 Google I/O conference while the five runner-ups will get the new Nexus 6P.

Sandi

Tech blogger. Gadget junkie. Life lover. I love eyeliner. Miller runs through my veins.

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